Effects of Social Media on Teenagers

Effects of Social Media on Teenagers

January 10 2023 TalktoAngel 0 comments 105 Views

While social media can help you connect with people around the world, find things you're interested in, and find hours of enjoyment, scrolling endlessly can also have detrimental effects. Young adults who use social media are three times more likely to experience depression, according to research, which puts a big percentage of the population at danger for suicidal thoughts and actions.

Social media allows teenagers to form social networks, interact with others, and create online personas. These networks can be a valuable resource for young people, particularly for those who deal with exclusion, disabilities, or chronic illnesses.

Teenagers also use social media for fun and self-expression. The platforms can also educate teens on current events, facilitate international communication, and teach information on a variety of subjects, including good habits. Teenagers may even gain from using amusing, engaging, or providing a significant connection to peers and a sizable social network on social media.

Children's utilization of social media, on the other hand, can be toxic because it can shift their focus, hold them awake, and expose them to societal pressure, rumors, harassment, and unreasonable expectations of other people's lives.

It's possible that the risks are related to how frequently kids use social media. More than 6,500 12 to 15 year olds in the U.S. participated in a 2019 study that found that those who used social media more than three hours per day may be more likely to have mental health problems. A 2019 study in England involving more than 12,000 kids aged 13 to 16 found that accessing social media more than three times per day was linked to poor mental health and wellbeing in young people.

Other research has found associations between heavy social media use and signs of depression or anxiety. According to a 2016 study of more than 450 teenagers, frequent social media use, nocturnal social media use, and emotional involvement in social media (such as being upset when you can't log on) were all linked to lower sleep quality and higher feelings of anxiety and despair.

Teenagers' reactions to social media may also differ. A 2015 study discovered a connection between teen use of social media and cell phones for social comparison and feedback seeking and depressive symptoms. Additionally, a small 2013 study found that older teenagers' life satisfaction decreased when they utilized social media in a passive manner, such as by merely perusing other people's images. These declines had no impact on individuals who were using social media to connect with one another or to make a contribution their own information.

In addition, a recent study on the effects of social media on college freshman discovered that users' beliefs that others were happier than they were grew stronger the more time they spent on Facebook. However, the students' feelings toward this diminished the more time they spent going out with their buddies.

Experts contend that kids who post content on social media run the risk of disclosing intimate images or extremely personal stories due to their impulsive natures. Teenagers may consequently experience blackmail, harassment, or even bullying. Teenagers frequently publish online without considering these consequences or privacy concerns. Teen Counselling is one of the important services offered by TalktoAngel, the No. 1 platform of India for Teen Therapy.

By taking specific actions, you can promote responsible social media use while also reducing some of its negative consequences. You can take into account the following suggestions:

Set sane boundaries. Your teen should be taught how to use social media without allowing it interfere with his or her activities, sleep, meals, or homework. Encourage a routine without using any electronic devices before night by keeping phones and tablets out of teenagers' bedrooms. Set a good example by following these rules.

Observe your teen's online activity. Tell your teen that you'll be regularly reviewing their social media profiles. At a minimum, try to do this once every week. Make sure to complete everything you begin.

Describe what is improper. Educate your child to avoid spreading rumors, intimidating others, or causing suffering to one’s image, honor and prestige, whether in person or using online platforms. What information is suitable and safe to publish on social media? Talk it over with your teen.

Encourage them to have face-to-face interactions with their pals. Teenagers at risk for social anxiety disorder should pay special attention to this.

Discuss social media. Discuss how you personally use social media. Inquire of your teen about how they are using social media and how it affects them. Remind your teen that exaggerated images are common on social media.

We are all familiar with how the algorithm operates: the more you look at your phone, the more attractive content it will send to keep your eyes on it. It can be challenging to stop the habit of checking Instagram or Twitter frequently and refreshing to see more, but it's necessary to take breaks for our physical and emotional well-being. Parents can set a positive example by acting responsibly online. Here are some options for you:

Remove social media apps from your phone. You don't have to cancel your account, although doing so will stop you from constantly refreshing the page when you unlock your phone.

Leave your gadgets at home. Leave the technology at home and spend time with your friends and family. Everyone is aware of how difficult it is to give up your phone, but once you do, you'll notice how much more aware you are of your surroundings.

Activate notification blocking. Go to your settings page and disable social media app notifications. You will notice that you check in less frequently without the continual reminders.

Set a time limit. Turn on time limits so that the app will terminate your session when you reach your limit.

If you believe you could benefit from professional assistance, speak with an Online Counsellor and the Best Psychologist in India of your choice about your difficulties. With just one click, you can connect with the “Psychologist near me”, counsellors, psychologists, and Online Psychiatrists at TalktoAngel an Online Counselling and digital health wellbeing platform, who can help you handle your mental health difficulties and take care of your psychological well-being on your own.

Contributions by:Dr (Prof) R K Suri, Clinical Psychologist & Teen Therapist Ms. Aditi Bhardwaj



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