Empty Nest Syndrome

Empty Nest Syndrome

July 29 2023 TalktoAngel 0 comments 1082 Views

"Empty nest syndrome" or nest syndrome refers to the grief that many parents feel when their children leave the nest. Since women are more likely than men to have primary careers, they are more likely to get this illness. Since an adult child moving out of the house is seen as a normal, healthy event, unlike the loss experienced when (for example) a loved one passes away, the pain of empty nest syndrome typically goes unrecognized. There might not be many individuals who can sympathize with or support distressed parents. Other unpleasant life events or significant changes that take place at the same time, such as retirement or menopause, may make empty nest syndrome worse. It's suggested to have a detailed evaluation of issues arising on account of Nest syndrome by seeking online counselling with the best online clinical psychologist at TalktoAngel, the best online counseling platform form for Nest syndrome counseling.

What is the meaning of empty nest syndrome?

Empty nest syndrome is the sorrow or emotional disturbance that parents experience after their children grow up and leave the home where they were raised. Nest refers to the proverb that states that when kids grow up and move on, they "spread their wings." When the end of the high school or college season is coming, the phrase "empty nest syndrome" is frequently heard. It evokes a range of emotions, including anxiety, excitement, relief, and grief.

There is no clinical condition or diagnostic for the empty nest syndrome that many parents of adult children feel. The emotional ambiguity of a typical life change is reflected in it. While people frequently concentrate on the negative emotional aspects, this period in a person's life might present fresh opportunities. People can take the chance to redefine who they are, decide what they want for the rest of their lives, rededicate energy to their own vocations or areas of interest, and restart the marital connection without the countless responsibilities of caring for and rearing another human being.

Signs and symptoms of empty nest syndrome

  • Sadness
  • Loss
  • Depression
  • Loneliness
  • Distress
  • A lack of meaning and purpose in life
  • Heightened marital conflict

Causes of empty nest syndrome

When a child reaches a particular developmental stage, it is natural for them to leave the parental house. As long as parents have established a solid and positive relationship with their child, empty nest syndrome is typically not as severe as parents may think. On the other side, if the parent and child had conflicts, separated, hostile, or resentful relationship, both the parent and the child might go through emotional difficulty once the child moves out. The ideal result includes supportive relationships and cooperation among all parties. A positive relationship gives all parties an excellent opportunity for healthy contact, which is essential for both parents who are becoming older and young adults who are progressing toward independence.

Stages of empty nest syndrome

Empty nest syndrome comprises three stages. They are:

1. Grief

It's normal to experience overwhelming sadness and a sense of loss when your child first moves out of the house. The smallest things can be causing you to get tearful and emotionally charged. Your sadness may cause you to temporarily withdraw from society as you attempt to cope with the profound change that has occurred in your life.

2. Relief

After a few months, you could start to appreciate your new freedom and lifestyle. You now have time for self-care and hobbies instead of the mental strain of having to take your kids everywhere and never-ending housework. There will undoubtedly be a sense of relief from this newly liberated lifestyle and attitude.

3. Joy

You should arrive at the stage of pleasure once you have experienced the roller coaster of despair, relief, and independence. You should now be comfortable with your new, independent cycles. You might be creating new social networks or finally making plans for that romantic holiday. Or perhaps even a trip alone. You can be sure that with your purposeful parenting, you have given your child the love, education, and support they need to succeed in the outside world.

Treatment for empty nest syndrome

Following are the key approaches to treating empty nest syndrome

Build relationships with others

Spend your free time catching up with former friends. Given that they hardly have time for themselves, let alone others, parents may ignore their social interactions. Make an effort to enter a fresh social setting with fresh relationships. Making an investment in friendships is a positive diversion that reduces loneliness.

Consult a professional mental health expert or psychologist

You should seek expert advice if the symptoms of empty nest syndrome are severe and persistent. The support of a qualified online counselor or the best psychologist near me can help you cope with your grief and control your emotions. It's possible to mistake the signs of empty nest syndrome for those of depression, but if you experience the former, there are secure treatments available.

Set objectives for the future.

Having a positive outlook on the future reduces grief. It encourages motivation and a sound sense of perspective. The process of defining, setting objectives, and achieving goals helps to promote the growth of your true self.

Start a new hobby or line of work

It may be immensely gratifying to explore other elements of your identity and broaden your interests. Try out a range of fresh hobbies in your neighborhood, whether they are yoga courses or reading clubs. A new sport or physical activity is a great way to increase your social horizons while preserving your overall fitness.

Contribution: Dr (Prof) R K Suri, Clinical Psychologistlife coach & mentor TalktoAngel & Dr Sakshi Kochhar Psychologist



SHARE


Leave a Comment:

Related Post



Categories

Related Quote

"It is okay to have depression, it is okay to have anxiety and it is okay to have an adjustment disorder. We need to improve the conversation. We all have mental health in the same way we all have physical health."

"It is okay to have depression, it is okay to have anxiety and it is okay to have an adjustment disorder. We need to improve the conversation. We all have mental health in the same way we all have physical health." - Prince Harry

“You say you’re ‘depressed’ – all I see is resilience. You are allowed to feel messed up and inside out. It doesn’t mean you’re defective – it just means you’re human.”

“You say you’re ‘depressed’ – all I see is resilience. You are allowed to feel messed up and inside out. It doesn’t mean you’re defective – it just means you’re human.” - David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas

“Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.” 

“Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.”  - Margaret Mead

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.”  

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.”   - Frederick Douglass

"Mental health and physical health are one in the same for me - they go hand in hand. If you aren't physically healthy, you won't be mentally healthy either - and vice versa. The mind and body is connected and when one is off, the other suffers as well"

"Mental health and physical health are one in the same for me - they go hand in hand. If you aren't physically healthy, you won't be mentally healthy either - and vice versa. The mind and body is connected and when one is off, the other suffers as well" - Kelly Gale

Best Therapists In India


Self Assessment



GreenWave