Parenting an LGBTQ+ Teen

Parenting an LGBTQ+ Teen

January 25 2024 TalktoAngel 0 comments 352 Views

Your adolescent has recently informed you that they identify as LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer). Or perhaps they've mentioned that they're having gender dysphoria - feelings of uneasiness that their sex assigned at birth does not correspond with their gender - and aren't sure what to do.

What is the best way to respond as a parent or caregiver? How do you assist your LGBTQ youth? What should you avoid doing if you don't know how to react?

The support of parents for their LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and/or queer) adolescent children is crucial to their healthy development. Every young person thrives when they understand that their parents love and accept them exactly as they are, whether they are straight or LGBTQ. This is most certainly the greatest protective factor for teenagers as they traverse the ups and downs of life.

Too many LGBTQ youth have difficulties as they come out, emphasizing the importance of parents' unconditional love and acceptance. According to research and experience, when families accept LGBTQ adolescents, they receive a variety of benefits such as increased self-esteem, improved overall health, and closer family relationships. Family acceptance, crucially, protects against bullying, sadness, substance misuse, and suicide. Seeking Online Counselling with the Best Clinical Psychologist near me at TalktoAngel would help in the identification of the orientation of your child; it would also help in providing better awareness to you to accept key issues.

Create an accepting household

Even young youngsters see their parents' reactions to others. They discover whether their parents are more prone to embrace or condemn others who are different from them. They discover whether their parents are willing to listen, learn, and grow. Consult with LGBTQ+ or queer therapist and engage them in dialogue.

Every adolescent is preoccupied with resolving the fundamental question, "Who Am I?" Most young people are worried that they will be rejected in some way by the people whose opinions they most value - their parents. LGBTQ youth are frequently aware of their orientation or identity long before they express it. They may be apprehensive about whether their parents will accept this aspect of them. Households that embrace persons who are different from them set the tone for healthy growth for this and many other reasons. If your home is not currently accepting, consider making some attempts to improve in this area for the sake of your child.

Support your LGBTQ+ teen

Open communication is essential for healthy family interactions. Your LGBTQ teen will benefit from open conversation as well. Coming out is a process, and being an attentive listener who is also generally supportive sets the tone for productive conversation. In other words, even if your kid hasn't "come out," showing support is critical.

If you believe a discussion regarding your child's sexual orientation is on the horizon, there are various ways to explore. These tactics will make your teen feel more secure and supported. Preparation is one option. Recognize that sexuality is not a choice and that you are assisting your child in being their most true self. Learn about the LGBTQ culture. Look up words. Knowing more enables you to ask more sensitive and meaningful inquiries. Another option is to contact a professional, such as your child's pediatrician or an Online Counsellor. They can assist your family through this difficult time. Many parental support groups also provide advice.

If your child does come out to you, you may be at a loss for what to say. You do not need to compose a lengthy speech. Instead, say a few words and show your concern. Choosing to reveal their identity to you is an act of enormous strength on their part, as well as a sign of trust and love for you. It could also be a test in which they are unsure how you will react.

Process your feelings

Even the most loving and welcoming families may struggle at first to accept the news about their adolescent's sexual orientation or gender identity. This is not the time to feel bad about yourself for needing time. Simply commit to growth. You may require some time to process your feelings. If you feel the need, request time and space from your child to process your emotions. However, as you request time, emphasize that your affection for them is undeniable. Your youngster requires your assistance now more than ever. You may be unsure of how to express yourself or which words to use. But make it clear to your child that you are not leaving and that you are all in this together.

Reach out for help for yourself to manage the situation better, you can do so with the help of Online Counselling as it is convenient and there are several queer-friendly and Queer-Supportive Therapists to provide you the best help possible at TalktoAngel.

Learn the Facts about LGBTQ+

It is important to remove certain misconceptions about gender and sexual orientation, empowering your parenting with knowledge of parenting by expert Queer-Supportive Therapists would be of great help.

Get Involved with School and other Support Groups

Do advocacy for the rights of your child, speak to other parents, and teachers, and work as a team to resolve and treat any bullying as a collaborative team.

Contribution: Dr (Prof) R K Suri, Clinical Psychologist, life coach & mentor TalktoAngel & Aditi Bhardwaj, Psychologist



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