Teen Depression: Parent's Guide

Teen Depression: Parent's Guide

December 17 2022 TalktoAngel 0 comments 185 Views

It might be challenging to tell the difference between typical teen growing pains of sadness, despair, and depression. But here's how to spot the symptoms and help your child as much as possible. Every teen experiences gloomy or moody moments. But when a teenager's negative mood lasts for a few weeks or more and other behavioral changes occur, it may be an indication of depression.

Proper teen therapy can help depression get better. However, if an issue is not handled, it may persist or worsen. An adolescent who is sad requires more assistance from their parents and other adults in their life outside of treatment.

Speak to your teen if you believe they are depressed. Let them know that you wish to comprehend their situation. If they want to chat, listen.

Teenagers are more often affected by depression than adults, due to developmental challenges, including hormonal changes faced in difficult adolescent years. In fact, it's evident from studies that one in five teenagers from all socioeconomic backgrounds experiences depression at some point in their adolescence. Although depression is very treatable, the majority of depressed teenagers never obtain assistance.

Teenage sadness extends beyond irritability. Every area of a teen's life is impacted by this major health issue. Thankfully, it is curable, and parents can support in the treatment plan. Your teen may overcome depression and regain control of their life with the help of your love, advice, and support.

While occasional irritability or disruptive behavior is common during the adolescent years, sadness is something else entirely. Teenage depression has severe implications that extend far beyond sorrowful feelings. The core of your teen's personality can be destroyed by depression, which can result in an overpowering feeling of dejection, hopelessness, or rage.

Teenagers' may have rebellious and harmful attitudes or behaviors, which can be signs of depression. Teenagers "act out" in the ways listed below in an effort to deal with their emotional pain:

Persistently bad mood: Depression is frequently characterized by persistent crying as a result of an overpowering sense of hopelessness. Teenagers with depression, however, might not always seem depressed. Instead, tension, wrath, and irritation may be the most noticeable signs.

Difficulties at school or College: Low energy and trouble concentrating are two symptoms of depression. This could affect a student's performance at school by causing low attendance, a reduction in grades, or irritation with their homework.

A decline in motivation for activities: You might observe that your teen displays less zeal for their preferred pastimes away from school. For instance, they might stop participating in a sport or activity or isolate themselves from their loved ones.

Moving away: Teenagers who are despondent frequently consider or really do run away from home. These efforts are typically a plea for assistance. They may have difficulties maintaining good relationships.

Abuse of alcohol and drugs: Teenagers who are depressed may try to self-medicate by using alcohol or drugs. Unfortunately, drug misuse just serves to worsen the situation.

Self-esteem issues: Feelings of ugly, shame, failure, and unworthiness can be brought on by and made worse by depression.

Mobile or electronic device dependence: Despite the fact that teenagers may utilize the Internet to escape their problems, frequent Smartphone and internet use just makes them feel more isolated and lonely.

Reckless actions or Risky Behaviour: Teenagers that are depressed may engage in risky or harmful behaviors including drunk driving, binge drinking, or unsafe sex.

Violence: Some sad teenagers—typically boys who have been bullied—can turn hostile and violent.

Unexpected changes in nutrition and sleep: Teenagers with depression may sleep more than normal or, conversely, struggle with insomnia. Additionally, you could observe that your adolescent is consuming more or less than usual.

There are many things you can do to support your child in beginning to feel better, despite the fact that depression can give your teen great suffering and disturb daily family life. The first step is to educate yourself on the symptoms of teen depression and what to do if you notice any of them.

How to assist a teen with depression

Don't wait and hope that the unsettling sensation will go away; depression can be quite harmful if left untreated. If you have reason to believe that your kid is depressed, express your worries in a supportive, nonjudgmental manner. The problematic behaviors and emotions you're observing are indications of a problem that needs to be handled, even if you're not certain that depression is the problem.

Telling your teen about the exact depression symptoms you've observed and the reasons they concern you will start a conversation. Then, when your child opens up, be ready and eager to genuinely listen to what they have to say. Refrain from asking many questions, but make it known that you are prepared and willing to offer whatever assistance is needed.

How to approach a young person who is depressed

Put listening before lecturing. As soon as your adolescent starts to speak, resist the desire to criticize or make assumptions. The fact that your youngster is speaking is crucial. Simply letting your teen knows that you're there for them completely and unconditionally will do the most help.

Be persistent while being kind. Even if they initially ignore you, don't quit up. For teenagers, discussing depression can be extremely difficult. Even if they try, they could find it difficult to convey their emotions. While still stressing your care and desire to listen, respect your child's comfort level.

Recognize their emotions. Even if you think your teen's sentiments or fears are ridiculous or unreasonable, don't try to talk them out of despair. Any well-intentioned attempts to reassure them that "things aren't that bad" would only come across as being unconcerned with their feelings. It can go a long way toward helping someone feel understood and supported simply to acknowledge the suffering and misery they are going through.

Embrace your instincts. You should believe your gut if your kid acts depressed but says there's nothing wrong and offers no reason. If your teen won't talk to you, think about asking a mental health professional, beloved teacher, or an Online Counsellor for help. It's crucial to start a conversation with them. 

Consultation with Clinical Psychologist: It is recommended that parents should consult with the best child psychologist, who will identify the reasons for depression and engage both child and parents in counseling. For further assistance connect with the Best Psychologist in India for the Best Teen Counselling at TalktoAngel India’s No 1 Online Counselling and mental health well-being platform.

Contributed by: Dr (Prof) R K Suri & Ms. Aditi Bhardwaj

 



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