Understanding Anger Arousal Cycle: Managing Anger by Counseling

Understanding Anger Arousal Cycle: Managing Anger by Counseling

February 02 2024 TalktoAngel 0 comments 532 Views

Anger is a strong emotion that is experienced when anything goes wrong or when someone does something wrong with you. In anger moments one experience often experiences stress, annoyance, and irritation. Everybody occasionally experiences anger. Anger is an atypical response to frustration arising from irritating or challenging circumstances. Only when anger is expressed excessively and starts to interfere with your everyday schedule activities and interpersonal interactions, does it tend to become a problem. Anger can range from simple irritability to violent episodes of self-harm to hurting someone. Sometimes it can be excessive or unreasonable. There might be some frustrating situations that you are not able to handle and hence are out of your control in anger, rage, or violent episodes. It is suggested to do FREE SELF ASSESSMENT and seek Online Counseling with the best anger management psychologist online.

Characteristics of anger

Our bodies experience specific physiological and biochemical changes when we are frustrated and express anger accordingly. Examples of biological manifestations in your body may include:

  • An increase in energy
  • Increasing blood pressure
  • An increase in the chemicals noradrenaline and adrenaline
  • Body temperature rising
  • Heightened muscular tension

Everybody’s reaction to frustrating events is unique and thus, the expression of anger is unique, and we all exhibit it in various ways. When you're upset, you could notice some external traits such.

  • Voices raising
  • Tightened fists
  • Making faces or wrinkles
  • Jaw clenched
  • Physically shaky
  • Heart palpitations
  • Excessive sweating
  • Pace too quickly

Complications of anger

Anger is a perfectly normal and typically healthy emotion. However, losing control can be harmful to your emotional and physical health. When you're disturbed, your body goes through some physiological and biological changes. Your blood pressure rises and your heart rate accelerates. Hormones like noradrenaline and adrenaline are also released by your body. Frequently becoming upset can cause your body to go through these changes, which can result in a variety of illnesses and issues, including:

  • Stomach ulcers
  • Bowel issues
  • Diabetes

The anger arousal cycle

Five stages make up the angry arousal cycle: the trigger, the escalation, the crisis, the recovery, and the depression. Knowing the cycle better enables us to understand both our reactions and other people's reactions.

The trigger phase: The anger cycle begins in the trigger phase when a certain circumstance occurs. We have a disagreement or learn something that surprises us. At some level, we feel threatened, and our body responds by preparing its defenses.

The escalation phase: The escalation phase is when our body gets ready for a crisis with increased breathing (rapid breathing), an elevated heart rate and blood pressure, tight muscles for action, a louder or higher-pitched voice, and altered pupil size, shape, and brow position. The next time you feel angry, remember these things. Your physical posture might also change.

The crisis phase: Our survival instinct, sometimes known as the fight-or-flight response, activates during a crisis. Our body is prepared to respond or take action now. Unfortunately, at this stage, we have much worse judgment and may not be able to make the best decisions possible.

The recovery phase: After some response during the crisis phase, the recovery phase begins. The body begins to recuperate from the severe stress and consumption of energy which had taken place. Our blood's level of adrenaline gradually decreases. As thinking starts to replace the survival response, judgment quality returns.

The post-crisis depression phase: When the body enters a brief phase during which the heart rate drops below normal so the body may regain its balance, this is known as the Post-crisis Depression Phase. The return of awareness and energy enables us to evaluate what just happened. We can start experiencing emotional depression, sorrow, or guilt.

Tips for managing anger

1. Postpone the discussion till you are calmer.

If you believe your anger has reached a point where you are unable to control your words and tone, choose to address the problem later. You can state, "I don't want to discuss the matter right now," and make plans to discuss it later.

2. Reduce stress and rage actively.

Take steps to calm yourself down, such as through relaxation, exercise, or dialogue, and devise a plan of action for dealing with the problem.

3. General well-being has an effect.

Physical exhaustion, pain, alcohol, narcotics, or other recent pressures can all lower your threshold for anger. At such times, avoid uncomfortable conversations.

4. Understand yourself.

We all have sensitivities based on our past experiences that make us more inclined to become upset in particular situations. The anger may not be justified by the current situation, but rather a reaction to a previous experience.

5. If assistance is required, request for professional help.

If, after reflecting on the situation, you recognize that you may not be able to discuss the difficulties without blaming and accusing each other, it is recommended that you seek the assistance of an independent third party. Blame and negative judgments almost always result in greater conflict. Help with conflict resolution and anger management is required. Seek professional help by consulting with the best clinical psychologist at TalktoAngel.

While suppressing our angry feelings is often important in the short term to prevent reacting aggressively and defensively, it is not a healthy long-term option. Addressing the issue directly and calmly while employing effective communication skills will, in the end, resolve angry feelings.

Contribution: Dr (Prof) R K Suri, Clinical Psychologist, life coach & mentor TalktoAngel Dr Sakshi Kochhar Psychologist



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